Boston Terrier

by Doris Donnerman
(last updated August 17, 2009)

Originally a Pit Terrier, used for fighting and being the subject of much wrangling as to type, size, and color, the Boston Terrier is one of the very few breeds to be developed in America. Despite the stormy stages of his development, this handsome little dog quickly found favor with a great many Americans and now, with type well established, is firmly entrenched in many countries throughout the world.

There was not much uniformity of type in these early dogs. They had not yet become known as Boston Terriers, but were shown in the general category of Bull Terriers. As their numbers increased, along with the desire for exhibiting, the Boston show committee opened classes for Round-headed Bull and Terriers, any color. This brought increased interest.

The Boston fanciers organized a club and in 1891, under the name "American Bullterrier Club," filed application for membership in the American Kennel Club. It was suggested by James Watson, noted writer and authority, which the dog was not a Bullterrier and, as it was bred only at Boston and vicinity, a better name would be "Boston Terrier." The name of the club was changed to Boston Terrier Club and it was admitted to membership in the American Kennel Club in 1893.

The general appearance of the Boston Terrier should be that of a lively, highly intelligent, smooth coated, short-headed, compactly-built, short-tailed, well-balanced dog of medium station. He should be of brindle color and evenly marked with white. The head should indicate a high degree of intelligence and should be in proportion to the size of the dog. The body should be rather short and well knit, the limbs strong and neatly turned. The tail should be short. There should be no feature so prominent that the dog appears badly proportioned. The coat is short, smooth, bright and fine in texture.

The Boston Terrier is lively and friendly. He has an excellent disposition and is highly intelligent, causing him to be in high demand as a companion.

The weights are generally divided into three divisions. The lightweight is for those dogs less than fifteen pounds. The middleweight is for those over fifteen pounds and under twenty pounds. The heavyweight is twenty pounds but not exceeding twenty-five pounds.

Author Bio

Doris Donnerman

Doris is a jack of all trades, writing on a variety of topics. Her articles have helped enlighten and entertain thousands over the years. ...

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